Use Your Resources!!!

It’s Crunch Time! It’s close to the end of the semester. You have 3 papers due, you need to start studying for your final exams, that dreaded group project is far from complete and to top it all off you might be graduating this May. You are stressed out. But don’t freak out. Now is as great of a time as ever to visit a few of the many resources The University of South Florida St. Petersburg has to offer.

The Wellness Center offers stress and time management workshops. They can help you plan out the last few weeks of the semester so that you use your time wisely. Good time management skills allow you to focus more on your academic performance and less on that overwhelming feeling that you may have. The professionals at the Wellness Center are also there if you need someone to talk to or if you need minor medical attention.

The Academic Success Center offers tutoring to USFSP students free of charge. They are located in DAVIS 107 and no appointment is needed to receive help, however, you should ensure that there will be a tutor present to help you with the specific subject you need help with. They have tutors that can help you with many courses: math, science, business, foreign language, and writing. The website provides links on great study habits, developing writing skills, and test dates for standardized tests.

The Career Center is here for all of your career exploration needs. For graduation Seniors, there is the Last Chance Job Search Boot Camp on Thursday, April 17. This workshop will review the entire job search process! Giving you the leg up above the competition in the job search process and helping you identify and snag your first post-graduation job. To all students, we also give advice on resumes and cover letters, provide mock interviews, and give you the resources to find a current job on and off campus.

So don’t let these next weeks bring you down, be encouraged and utilize the free resources that the university has to offer.

The Wellness Center
http://www.usfsp.edu/wellness
(727) 873-4422
Student Life Center (SLC)
Room 2200

Academic Success Center
http://www.usfsp.edu/success
727-873-4632
academicsuccess@usfsp.edu
Davis 107

Career Center
http://www.usfsp.edu/career
(727) 873-4129
Student Life Center (SLC)
Room 2300


 

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A Guide to Getting a Summer Job

Summer A Monitor

DON’T WAIT! The time is now to start looking for that perfect summer job! The semester is almost over and whether you are going home or staying on campus, extra cash over the summer would be nice. Here are some tips for getting that summer job you were hoping for.

 

  1.        Create a Resume
    Be sure that you have a resume that you can give to employers looking to hire. If an employer is not hiring, you can still leave a resume with them in order to be considered for future openings. Come into the Career Center for resume help or constructive critiques.

 

  1.        Start Early
    Employers start hiring for summer jobs as early as March. Don’t be the last on the list. Start sending out applications and resumes to employers as soon as possible.  Spend at least an hour a day researching the types of jobs you want to pursue. Look for work in growing industries such as government jobs, healthcare, the retail industry, and the service industry.

 

  1.        Use your Networks
    Networking is not only for getting that full-time career opportunity. Ask your family and friends for help brainstorming job possibilities. If you have previously had a job, ask your former employer if they are hiring, if not, ask for business contacts to find other job openings. Send a professional email to others in your network stating your skills and specific areas you would like to work in.

 

  1.        Prepare for the Interview
    Mock interviews are a great way to prepare. Get interview tips and set up a mock interview at the Career Center (while most of our services are walk-ins mock interviews must be scheduled with a staff member). Dress appropriately, overdressed is better than underdressed. Show up early to your interview, bring your resume, turn off your cell phone, have a strong handshake and make eye contact when meeting the employer.

 

  1.        Be honest about your time commitment
    Do not set hours that you know you will not be able to fully commit to. If you are also taking classes this summer employers will be understanding. On the other hand do not take every Friday off. Employers will figure out that your family emergency is really a trip to the beach.

 

 

Here are some sites to use for your job search.
Recruit-a-Bull: https://www.myinterfase.com/usfsp/student
Tampa Job and Career Fair: http://tampabayjobfair.com
http://www.pinellascounty.org/hr/employment.htm
www.Snagajob.com
www.summerjobs.com

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Beware of Employment Scams

Video from the Federal Trade Commission

If a job seems too good to be true, be cautious. There are various employment scams designed to gain access to people’s money, bank account information, social security number, or identity. These scams often are posted on online job boards, in newspapers, or via e-mail.The USFSP Career Center will block fraudulent employers from posting positions on Recruit-A-Bull once we become aware of them. However, due to the creatively deceptive means by which jobs are posted by scammers, we cannot guarantee the validity of every employer or job posted. If you are suspicious or concerned about a company or job posting you find on Recruit-A-Bull, please contact the Career Center at (727) 873-4129, so we can investigate the issue immediately.

Types of Scams

There are a variety of employment scams. Below you will find four examples of commonly used employment scams:

Payment Forward Scam
This scam occurs after you apply for a position or reply to a spam e-mail. The employer will reply with instructions for a “test” before employment. As part of the test, you receive a check in the mail and are asked to deposit the check into your account and send a certain amount via wire transfer to another person. The employer promises that you will keep a percentage.  It is a scam because the check is not valid; and if you deposit the check and transfer the money, you will be responsible for the funds.

Application Fee Scam
With this scam, you are charged between $25 -$100 for a “guaranteed” employment opportunity application. People have used this scam by posing as members of the cruise line industry, the U.S. Postal Service, and other organizations. Always check with the company in which you are applying to learn more about the application process. Employment applications should be free, and there are no “guaranteed” positions.

Phishing Scam
This scam occurs when you receive an unsolicited e-mail from an employer stating they saw your posted resume. The “employer” states your skills match the position for which they are hiring, but they need more information from you. The employer asks for personal information, which they may use to steal your identity. Before providing any information, be sure to research the company and verify the posting. Always be cautious when sharing personal information, such as mailing address, phone number, social security number, identification number, or banking information.

Mystery Shopper Scam
There are legitimate mystery shopping companies that hire college students and others to provide feedback on stores, restaurants, and businesses. However, there are scammers posing as mystery shopping companies. This type of scam can occur through an unsolicited e-mail or via a job board posting. The fraudulent company asks you to pay a fee to become an employee. This is a scam because you should not have to pay a company to become an employee. Another variation of this scam occurs when the employer asks you to review a wire transfer company and complete a money transfer, this action then becomes a payment forward scam as described above.

How Do You Spot a Scam?

Review the information below to identify potential “red flags” for employment scams.

  1. Catchy job titles. Scammers often use words in the job title to catch your attention, such as “Work at Home”, “No Experience Necessary”, “Make $1000 a week”, or “Work just one hour a week”.
  2. Required payment. When payment is requested for training materials, starter kit, or other items it could be a scam.
  3. Lack of employer details. If few details about the employer are included in the ad, posting, or e-mail, such as no company name, website, e-mail address, or location, then this may be a scam.
  4. Fake website. If the website is hosted by a free domain, such as Yahoo, it may be a scam. Scammers will use a legitimate company’s website information and post it as a fraudulent site. Research the company name and check domainwhitepages.com to identify when the website was created. If the website was created recently or owned by someone not in the same location as the company, it could be fraudulent.
  5. Unsolicited e-mails. If you receive an unsolicited e-mail and it comes from a free domain e-mail address (e.g., gmail.com, hotmail.com, or yahoo.com) it could be a scam. If the name of the e-mail signature does not match the name of the e-mail, this may be a scam. Never click on a link in an e-mail from someone you do not know, it could be a virus or other malicious software.
  6. Personal information requests. Requests for personal information via e-mail, such as a copy of your ID, bank account information, or social security number, can be used by identity thieves.
  7. Guaranteed job offered.  Legitimate employers do not promise a job before discussing your skills and experience.
  8. Specific words or phrases. Beware of words in the job description, such as wire transfers, PayPal, eBay, package forwarding, or money transfers, these are indicators of a scam.

Although this list is not all inclusive, the USFSP Career Center hopes you use the information and resources provided to keep you, your information, and your money safe. If you are ever concerned about a job posting or think you may have been a victim of an employment scam, do not hesitate to contact the Career Center, the USFSP Police, or your local law enforcement agency.

Additional Links

Below is a list of helpful resources for learning more about employment scams or to research possible fraudulent employers.

  1. Federal Trade Commission
    Learn about employment scams or file a complaint.
  2. National Consumers League Internet Fraud Watch
    Identify tips for avoiding online job scams and use the link to file a complaint.
  3. Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)
    File a complaint with IC3 or review Internet crime prevention tips.
  4. Better Business Bureau
    Research employers by reviewing reports, complaints, and accreditation status.
  5. RipOff Report
    Discover complaints about companies.
  6. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse
    Learn about avoiding online job scams.
  7. Job Scam Examples – Typical Job Scam Examples
    Review job scam examples and share scam information.
  8. Federal Trade Commission Job Scams Video

References:
Privacy Rights Clearinghouse:  http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs25a-JobSeekerPriv2.htm
Job Scam Examples – Typical Job Scam Examples: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/jobsearchscams/qt/scamexamples.htm
Job-Hunting/Job Scams:  http://ftc.gov/jobscams

Article Used with Permission from BGSU Career Center: http://www2.bgsu.edu/offices/career/page98699.html

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Explore. Engage. Excel.

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Explore. Engage. Excel.
The USFSP Career Center motto. What does it mean?
More importantly what does it mean for you?

The next three weeks I will be breaking down the USFSP Career Center motto and give you information on where to find material that will answer your specific questions from the “For Students” section of usfsp.edu/career. This section is set up using the Career Center motto to guide you through the Career Development process.

Explore
Explore is about discovering yourself (values, interests, skills, and personality) and then researching and finding the occupations that match your unique self.
Under the “Explore Your Options” section there are tools and links to help discover your career goals.

  • Diversity Resources lists different career websites by diversity. Whether you’re African American, disabled, or part of the LGBTQ community there are sites that help you find careers and job search advice catered to how you choose to identify.
  • Explore & Research provides links that will give you insight to different careers. America’s Career Infonet lists transferable skills used in many occupations. Career Zone lists occupations based on the six occupational clusters of the Holland Self-Directed Search. WetFeet provides testimony of people that work in each field, giving you the inside look on jobs that you wouldn’t find out until you began working. This section also has a salary and cost of living section that can help you determine what a certain career pays and how to live efficiently and comfortably with that salary.
  • Grad School tab gives you information to choosing the right graduate school and graduate program. There are links to help you understand if grad school is for you and how to write a personal statement if you choose to apply. There are also websites to help you prepare for grad school, school searches, tips to succeeding financial aid, admission test prep, and more career exploration.
  • Match Career to Major section helps students understand that working toward your career choice is not only about choosing the right major, but choosing the right major that will equip you with the skills you need to succeed in finding the right career for you. The links to the USFSP majors and what you can do with each one is presented in this section along with other sites that link majors with careers.
  • Self-Assessment is taking the time to reflect on your interests, skills, and work values. Understanding these will help you find a good match with careers using those traits. This section gives you links to different assessment tests that can be found online. There are also descriptions of the assessment tests that we offer here at the career center. I would suggest taking these tests in the career center so that one of our career advisors can help you better understand your results and what they mean.

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Is the Job & Internship Fair Right for You?

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The 2014 Job & Fair is coming upon us!!! Are you still deciding whether or not to attend? Are you even prepared to attend? Are you nervous about attending? Well I’m here to help! You SHOULD attend the Job & Internship fair. No matter what year in school you are the fair will be beneficial to you.

Juniors and Seniors: Now is the time to be searching for a career. Do not wait until you have already graduated to start looking. According to Money magazine it takes on average 3-9 months for a student to find work once they graduate college. 53% of degree-holders under the age of 25 are unemployed, don’t be that 53%.

If that isn’t a good enough reason to attend, think about the internships you can apply for that could potentially turn into careers.  Studies show that students who complete internships a 60% chance of a full-time job offer post-graduation. This will also be a great opportunity to network with the people that will be in your line of work. They could know someone who is looking to hire a person just like you!

Freshman and Sophomores: I bet you are thinking, “I’ll just wait until my Senior year to go to the job fair.” Don’t wait, go now! This is a great time to network with companies and individuals who are in your industry. Get to know them now and build connections so when the time comes to look for a career they will be more than willing to help. There are companies also looking for internships, and it is NEVER too early to have an internship. We also have a few part-time employers if you are currently in search of a job. Maybe you do not want to show up to the career fair because you don’t even know what career you want. This is the perfect place to view many different industries and ask questions about what their business entails.

If you don’t believe me come check it out for yourself!

**Dates to Know**

Resume and Cover Letter Writing- January 21 (SLC 2101 / 5-6PM)

Are you Career Fair Ready? – February 20 (SLC 2101 / 5-6PM)

Last Chance Resume Critiques- February 25 (USC Palm Room / 4-6PM)

 

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A Homecoming Reflection As Told by the USFSP Career Wizards

Wrapping up Homecoming Week 2013 has been a bittersweet occasion for most departments on campus. It was a wonderful way for everyone to come together and celebrate our school and welcome in a new academic year. The past week has brought forth fantastic events, as well as memories every student, faculty, and staff member will remember. Here at the Career Center, we made sure we participated in all the activities, and we even had some unique events of our own. All of us here really got into the Homecoming spirit and went all out! We completely “Oz-ed” out the office, and put hours of work into the office!

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Informational Interviews

interview

Informational interviews are a great way to understand the career choice you plan to pursue. They are a meeting of about 20-30 minutes between you, the person inquiring about a probable career, and the professional working in that field. Consider informational interviewing as a way to build your skills in interviewing, verbal and written communication, organization, investigation, and exhibiting initiative.

There are many reasons to conduct informational interviews:

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